Tonkatsu – Japanese Pork Cutlet

Tonkatsu – Japanese Pork Cutlet

I have many childhood memories of eating tonkatsu. My parents would always order me tonkatsu at restaurants, because I wouldn’t eat anything else. Once getting my breaded, deep-fried pork cutlet fix, I became a calm, happy child. While in Japan as a teen, I discovered many other ways you could eat tonkatsu. Not only could you eat it plain with rice and sauce, but you could eat it with eggs in a donburi (katsudon), with curry, with udon, or even in a sandwich!

Tonkatsu is probably my favorite home-cooked meal now. It’s quick and easy to make and can be used in many ways. They freeze well too, so you can make a bunch to save time and use for later. This tonkatsu recipe can also be made with chicken or any other meat. Don’t forget the tonkatsu sauce! Try adding ground toasted sesame seeds to your tonkatsu sauce for more flavor.

tonkatsu21

This recipe makes about 6 pork cutlets

Ingredients

  • 6 boneless pork chops (4.25oz or 120g each)
  • 2 large beaten eggs
  • flour to coat
  • panko bread crumbs (Japanese bread crumbs)
  • salt and pepper to season
  • oil for frying
  • tonkatsu sauce

Things You'll Need

Cooking Instructions

  1. Tenderize the pork with a mallet. Lightly season with salt and pepper.
  2. In a small mixing bowl, beat two large eggs. Add 1 1/2 tablespoon of flour and mix well with beaten egg. Lightly coat both sides of the meat with flour.
  3. Dip each flour coated meat into the egg mixture. Then shake off excess egg.
  4. Now coat each side of meat with panko bread crumbs.
  5. Deep Fry in hot oil for 2 minutes or until golden brown. Serve with shredded cabbage and tonkatsu sauce.
    tonkatsu12
  • http://kiwidoll.com/ Yura

    One suggestion if you’re using a regular stove top to heat the oil, make sure you set it to about medium high, and not the highest setting, or tonkatsu will just become brown instead of golden brown lol. I made the mistake of turning it to high and so my first piece was a bit burnt XD But the other three turned out perfect once I turned the heat down. Pictures of my first experimentation:

    http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i84/strawberry_yura/IMG_0794.jpg
    the two best are on top, and the burnt one is on bottom XD

    http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i84/strawberry_yura/IMG_0795.jpg
    Voila!

    Overall it was really easy to prepare and make!

  • yura_chan

    One suggestion if you’re using a regular stove top to heat the oil, make sure you set it to about medium high, and not the highest setting, or tonkatsu will just become brown instead of golden brown lol. I made the mistake of turning it to high and so my first piece was a bit burnt XD But the other three turned out perfect once I turned the heat down. Pictures of my first experimentation:

    http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i84/strawberry_yura/IMG_0794.jpg
    the two best are on top, and the burnt one is on bottom XD

    http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i84/strawberry_yura/IMG_0795.jpg
    Voila!

    Overall it was really easy to prepare and make!

  • Elizabeth

    hello, i tried doing this recipe. It was delicious, but when i fried it in a pan, the panko batter sticked, and it made a mess. How do i prevent tonkatsu from sticking? Also, when i fry tonkatsu, what temperature must i fry it in the stove top (low, medium, or high)?

    • http://mamaloli.com/ MamaLoli

      Hi~ I don’t think pan-frying is the best way for this recipe. To prevent from sticking, try using a 3QT pot. Fill it about halfway with oil and deep-fry at 375 degrees F. To know the correct oil temperature, try test frying a small batch of panko (about the size of a pea). The panko will float to the top in 1 second if the temperature is correct. If the heat is too low, the panko will sink. If it’s too hot, the panko will burn. Try the FryDaddy Deep Fryer. This is what I use and I highly recommend it. =)

  • Elizabeth

    hello, i tried doing this recipe. It was delicious, but when i fried it in a pan, the panko batter sticked, and it made a mess. How do i prevent tonkatsu from sticking? Also, when i fry tonkatsu, what temperature must i fry it in the stove top (low, medium, or high)?

    • http://mamaloli.com mamaloli

      Hi~ I don’t think pan-frying is the best way for this recipe. To prevent from sticking, try using a 3QT pot. Fill it about halfway with oil and deep-fry at 375 degrees F. To know the correct oil temperature, try test frying a small batch of panko (about the size of a pea). The panko will float to the top in 1 second if the temperature is correct. If the heat is too low, the panko will sink. If it’s too hot, the panko will burn. Try the FryDaddy Deep Fryer. This is what I use and I highly recommend it. =)

  • Kevin

    Followed steps and recipe. I made this two times so far, but I can't get it to look golden brown like yours and as crispy as the restaurant. Any suggestions?

  • http://mamaloli.com/ MamaLoli

    Hmm, it could be the oil temperature is too low causing the breadcrumbs on the outside to become soggy and not gold brown. If you make more than 1 tonkatsu at a time, that also drops the oil temperature. I usually make 1 tonkatsu at a time.

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  • Toby Wc Lee

    How can you cut the cabbage to such small size?

    • http://mamaloli.com/ MamaLoli

      I use a mandoline slicer~ I added a link above under the ingredients in “Things you might need” :)

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  • http://www.facebook.com/thaao Thaao Hanshew

    When I try to make katsu, the panko on the outside always browns quickly or even burns, but the inside is still uncooked. If I use a lower temperature, it just takes forever to brown, but still the meat is quite pink on the outside. I let them sit for about 5-10 minutes on a rack in hopes that they continue cooking, but still when I cut into them they are uncooked. I have been able to get them pretty much cooked using a low heat for the oil and cooking them for a long time until they are quite browned, and then I make katsudon with them so they get a little more cooking time when I cook them again with egg and onion. But still the meat never comes out white or even a pale pink, and the panko on the outside always gets very brown. What could I be doing wrong? I have been frying in a large, deep pan so that the chops do not touch the bottom of the pan. But it’s still a pan (it’s one I usually use for large stir-frys) and not a pot or frier or anything.

    • http://mamaloli.com/ MamaLoli

      Your oil is too hot if it’s burning. The perfect temperature is around 375 degree F or 190 degree C. Also your meat could be too thick! Try pounding it out some more~

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  • lizbeth aguirre

    Can we make this with beef too ? because my sister enjoys beef more than pork

    • http://mamaloli.com/ MamaLoli

      You can use beef, chicken, fish, shrimp, etc :) Good luck!